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Join date : 2018-01-13

PostSubject: Ammunition   Mon Jan 15, 2018 3:24 am

Ammunition

Types
-Hollow point frangible
-Armor piercing
-Tracer rounds
-Rubber




Hollowpoint Frangible
Hollowpoint bullets represent the pinnacle of stopping power in bullets, possessing a hollow cavity which increases the rounds expansion. This not only has the added advantage of increasing the wound cavity of the user, but also in making sure all the energy is absorbed by the target in question, and has a reduced chance of overpenetration. This significantly increases the damage done. While some hollow points provide little to no difference in performance, these represent hollow point frangible rounds, designed to explode or disintegrate on target. Mechanically, they subtract 1 from the user's dice pool, but add one automatic success. So, if the user normally has a dice pool of 10 and a damage of 1, they instead change their dice pool to 9, and do 2 damage. This increases the consistency of the damage, but reduces the accuracy, or chance of hitting. They have reduced ability to penetrate certain targets, suffering a -1 penalty to armor penetration, and suffering the same penalty to getting through durability of objects.


Armor Piercing

Armor piercing rounds are bullets which are designed specifically to get through armor. While some bullets posses a natural affinity for such effects, armor piercing rounds represent capabilities beyond that of ordinary lead rounds. Made up generally of a hardened material or with a penetrator, such as steel or tungsten, armor piercing rounds can get through objects by increasing pressure on single points, and by simply being harder than the target. An important factor in armor is the hardness, and not just total energy absorption; before knife proof layers were added ot kevlar for instance, sharpened objects such as knives or ice picks had an easier time getting through body armor than dull, soft lead bullets. Armor piercing rounds are the exception, possessing the same sharpness and high hardness. This is equates to +1 bonus to the armor piercing rating of the weapon. So for instance, if a weapon has an armor piercing rating of 2, it increases to 3. This however imposes a penalty to aim and damage; generally doing less damage to people, possessing a tendency to overpenetrate, a lighterweight, and generally decreased accuracy, this translates to a -2 penalty to all attack rolls involving armor piercing rounds. The improved armor penetration also applies to the durability of objects.

Tracer Rounds
Tracer rounds are bright, shiny rounds designed to be easily visible to the human eye, allowing the user to see the target more clearly. Doing less damage than an ordinary round, tracer rounds make up for this with increased accuracy, allowing a weapon to simply be more visible to the user. This removes any penalty for firing at night or in darkness (so long as the target is still visible), however it provides a +2 bonus to perception roll to notice the user, or a +4 at night. Additionally, it subtracts 1 damage from the damage of the weapon, but adds a +3 bonus to attack rolls. So for instance, if a user had a dice roll of 10 die, and 2 damage, they would instead have a dice roll of 13 die, and do 1 damage. Mechanically, this roughly translates to trading automatic successes for an increased chance to hit the targets. Some tracer rounds also have an increased chance of lighting objects on fire, known as incendiary rounds. With an exceptional success, the target is on fire, or is one fire automatically if directed at an easily flammable substance in general (like gasoline). Such rounds only confer a +2 bonus to attack rolls, instead of +3 of an ordinary tracer round.

Rubber Bullets
The rubber bullets of the past were generally far inferior to rubber bullets used in ghost in the shell, but now are essentially high density frangible polymer rounds. Combined with lead powder, they still have enough oomph to do some damage to the intended targets, but do less than ordinary firearms. This is represented by reducing the damage from lethal to bashing. This is useful in riot control or other situations where lethality with a weapon is desired to be avoided. This damage stacks however, so if a target has a health of 7 and you do a combined damage of 8 bashing damage, this turns in to 6 bashing damage and 1 lethal, as normal. They have reduced ability to penetrate certain targets, suffering a -1 penalty to armor penetration, suffering this penalty even when applied to getting through durability of objects. Rubber bullets also have a -1 penalty to accuracy at all ranges past the minimum range, still being of low enough density to possess poor aerodynamics.








Rifle Rounds
-5.56mm x 45mm NATO
-7.62mm x 39mm
-7.62mm x 51mm NATO


Pistol Rounds
-9mm x 19mm NATO
-5.45mm x 28mm
-.45 ACP


Heavy Rifle
-.50 Caliber Rifle
-20mm Rifle


12 GaugeĀ Shotgun Round
-Buckshot
-Saboted Slug
-Frag-12
-Quadrangle Buckshot

40mm Grenade
-High Explosive
-HEAP
-Flashbang
-Tear Gas

25mm Grenade
-High Explosive
-HEAP
-Flashbang
-Tear Gas


Last edited by Admin on Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:01 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Ammunition   Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:46 am

Ammunition weight and statistics

Rifle Ammunition
5.56mm x 45mm NATO
Weight (lb): 1 pound per 30 round magazine, 1.33 pounds per 40 round magazine
Weight (lb): .9 pounds per 30 round belt
Weight (grams): 12.5 grams per cartridge

7.62mm x 51mm NATO
Weight (lb): 1.33 pounds per 20 round magazine
Weight (lb): 1.2 pounds per 20 round belt
Weight (gram): 25 grams per cartridge

7.62mm x 39mm
Weight (lb): 1.5 pounds per 30 round magazine
Weight (lb): 2 pounds per 40 round magazine
Weight (gram): 16.3 grams per cartridge

12 Gauge
Weight (lb): 1.33 pounds per 20 round magazine
Weight (lb): 1 pound per 11 rounds
Weight (gram): 40 grams per cartridge

.50 Caliber
Weight (lb): .25 pounds per round
Weight (lb): 25 pounds per 100 round Box
Weight (gram): 113.5 grams per cartridge



Pistol Ammunition
Pistol ammunition receives inherent bonuses from suppressors.

9mm x 19mm
Weight (lb): .66 pounds per 20 round magazine
Weight (lb): 1 pound per 30 round magazine, 2 pound per 60 round magazine
Weight (gram): 12.5 grams per cartridge

5.45mm x 28mm
Weight (lb): .25 pounds per 18 round magazine
Weight (lb): .5 pound per 30 round magazine, 1 pound per 60 round magazine
Weight (gram): 6.25 grams per cartridge

.45 acp
Weight (lb): .5 pounds per 10 round magazine
Weight (gram): 21 grams per cartridge

.357 magnum
Weight (lb): .2 pounds per 6 rounds
Weight (grams): 16.5 grams per cartridge




Grenades

40mmx46mm Grenade
Weight (lb): .5 pounds per round
Weight (gram): .5 pounds, 225 grams per cartridge

The 40mm x 46mm grenade is primarily intended to launch high explosive fragmentation rounds, using the energy transferred by the gunpowder to the projectile not to damage the target in and of itself with kinetic energy, but to merely propel the container long distances and allow it to do damage.


25mm Grenade
Weight (lb): .5 pounds per round
Weight (gram): .5 pounds, 225 grams per cartridge

The 40mm x 46mm grenade is primarily intended to launch high explosive fragmentation rounds, using the energy transferred by the gunpowder to the projectile not to damage the target in and of itself with kinetic energy, but to merely propel the container long distances and allow it to do damage.
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